Small Rock Chip – Big Problem!

 

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Often drivers are lulled into a false sense of security by a small rock chip. They imagine that a small rock chip is somehow less likely to grow in to the dreaded crack that makes its way all the way across the windshield if left untreated. To begin with, most cracked windshields start with a small rock chip which later expands into a long crack. The crack may spread immediately, over night, or even in a matter of months to years. There is simply no way to tell when the damage is going to spread. Often customers inform me that the rock chip I am about to repair has been there for several years. I always tell them the same thing, which is that they have been on borrowed time, and very lucky at that. A rock chip may seem stable for a long time and then circumstances align causing it to suddenly break. Here’s some of the factors and physics behind what causes a rock chip to spread.

  1. Glass tends to expand and contract in the heat and the cold. Usually, the rock chip you can see with your eyes also contains several invisible micro cracks which extend further out. When the glass expands in the heat or contracts in the cold, already weakened by the impact of the rock, it may give way, cracking sometimes up to 2 feet or more.
  2. The impact of the rock hitting the windshield has removed a small piece of the surface glass, weakening the structural integrity of the windshield. Vibrations and bumps in the road can easily cause the chip to crack.
  3. Differences in atmospheric pressure can also cause a weakened windshield to crack. Often drivers report that a rock chip that had been on the windshield for months, suddenly cracked when they went into the mountains.
  4. Last, running the car heater or air conditioning can cause an unstable rock chip to crack. Like running a cold glass under hot water, or hot glass under cold water, the difference between the temperatures of the outer and inner layers of the windshield can cause the glass to shatter.

The size of the rock chip is immaterial. A tiny rock chip is just as likely to crack as a larger one. The same physics behind large rock chips are in play with smaller ones. That’s why I say that drivers are often lulled into a false sense of security when they have a small rock chip. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard the same story. It always starts something like this: “I had this little rock chip on my windshield that happened a few months ago and I thought, it was no big deal. Then I came out yesterday and it had spread to over a foot long. Is there anything you can do?” And of course, the answer is, “no”.

Rock chips are a pain in the neck no matter what size. My advice is to have it repaired immediately so it doesn’t become a much bigger, much more expensive, pain in the neck.

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